Breakout Sessions

Time

 Sessions

10:30 a.m.
  • …Did They Really Say That?! Addressing Bias in the Classroom
  • The Mindful College Student: A Critical Life Skill
  • The Importance of Self-Regulated Learning in the Context of College Chemistry
  • Better Together: Collaboration to Create More Inclusive Exams
  • Using Tech to Break Teaching’s Fourth Wall
11:25 a.m.
  • Lightning Round: Making Content Relevant (3 short presentations plus Q&A)
    Teaching for Transfer in Foreign Language Teaching
    Connecting Laboratory Experiments to Lecture Concepts
    Integrating Real World Examples in Online/Flipped Classroom Videos: Issues and Opportunities
  • Critically Listening to the Voices of Chinese International Students
  • Burn Your Teaching: Pedagogical Principles from Burning Man
  • How to Engage in Professional Learning that Matters – The University Institute for Teaching and Learning
  • The Virtual Poster Symposium: Using Universal Design to Accommodate All Students
1:10 p.m.
  • Lightning Round: Connecting with Students (3 short presentations plus Q&A)
    Wordle as a Crowdsourced Pre-Assessment for Introductory Courses
    Promoting Inclusive Classroom Connections: The 1st Day Survey
    Getting to Know You! Making Personal Connections with Students in an Online Course Using the
    Carmen Tools
  • e-Portfolios for Online Global Learning
  • The Bravest Choice: A Poetics of Courage for the Twenty-First Century Classroom
  • Promoting Academic Success through Learning to Learn Strategies
  • Using Writing to Introduce Diversity and Inclusion Concepts
2:10 p.m.
  • Lightning Round: Enhancing Teaching with Technology (3 short presentations plus Q&A)
    Lessons from Flipping the Classroom
    Get Your Discussions Out of a Funk!
    Getting to Know Outcomes in Carmen
  • Laugh With Us! The Pedagogy of Laughter in Sex Education
  • Helping Students View Mistakes as Learning Opportunities
  • How to Implement and Evaluate Improv Activities in Undergraduate Classrooms
  • Is a Picture Worth 1000 Words? Using Video to Engage Students in Discussing Implicit Bias

10:30 a.m.

…Did They Really Say That? Addressing Bias in the Classroom

Location: Bob Evans Memorial Auditorium

Lena Tenney, Kirwan Institute for the Study of Race & Ethnicity

Learning Outcomes

  • Participants will be able to define the bystander effect, microaggressions, and the role of an active bystander.
  • Participants will be able to articulate at least three research-supported benefits of creating inclusive learning environments.
  • Participants will be able to analyze the context of a situation in which bias has emerged in the classroom and select a correspondingly appropriate strategy for addressing the incident.

Description

Have you ever been in a class discussion when a student said something biased, but you were not sure how to respond as the instructor? Whether due to high pressure, not being an expert on the identity group being targeted, or simply not knowing what to say in the moment, many of us struggle to address biased comments in the classroom—especially if we are not sure whether the student making the biased comment actually meant to cause harm.

As educators, we must be empowered to take action when bias manifests in our classrooms so that we can build inclusive connections with all students. This session will incorporate research related to the bystander effect, microaggressions, perceptions of bias in college classrooms, and benefits of creating inclusive learning environments. This session will equip participants with actionable skills to facilitate educational conversations in response to comments/actions that are racist, homophobic, transphobic, ableist, etc., rather than eliciting a defensive reaction from the student who has (perhaps unintentionally) caused harm through their biased remarks. Participants in this session will thus learn how to communicate effectively in challenging situations through the employment of strategies that can be tailored to the circumstances at hand.

The Mindful College Student: A Critical Skill

Location: International Room (110)

Maryanna Klatt, Family Medicine

Learning Outcomes

  • Participants will explore self-reflection as useful pedagogy.
  • Participants will experience a mindfulness exercise used in class.
  • Participants will critically analyze the usefulness of mindfulness within the academy.

Description

One’s first year of college is a time of great personal, social, and academic growth. It is the most critical time to begin developing the habits and mindset that will determine who one becomes following graduation. In order to be the best version of oneself, self-awareness must be given adequate attention. Contemplative education courses and academic programs emerging in universities across the United States have a unique opportunity to help students gain both self-awareness and an awareness of how the self is situated in a larger context. Research utilizing meditation in higher education shows promise in building resilience, interpersonal skills, and attentional control. Pragmatic, reflective pedagogy that successfully cultivates personal and social awareness is an avenue to give our students critical skills that could enhance their approach not only to college but to life. The Mindful College Student is a freshman seminar meant to introduce students to the practice of being present. The course utilizes guided meditation and reflective writing to help students reflect upon their ‘‘performance of self’’ to increase awareness and help sculpt their personal and academic lives, emphasizing that creating inclusive connections, is both an individual and communal process.

The Importance of Self-Regulated Learning in the Context of College Chemistry

Location: Gehres Room (214)

Shirley L. Yu, Educational Studies
Stephen Pearson, Chemistry & Biochemistry
Yeo-eun Kim, Educational Studies
Ted Clark, Chemistry & Biochemistry
Matthew Stoltzfus, Chemistry & Biochemistry

Learning Outcomes

  • Participants will analyze how self-regulated learning (SRL) theory, metacognition, cognition, motivation, and behavior impact academic outcomes.
  • Participants will be able to adopt aspects of self-regulated learning into their courses to enhance achievement and retention.
  • Participants will investigate gender roles in sense of belonging in general chemistry courses.

Description

According to self-regulated learning (SRL) theory, metacognition, cognition, motivation, and behavior are important factors impacting academic outcomes (Pintrich, 2004). We examined whether gender moderated the mediating role of SRL in explaining the relations between personal and learning context (sense of STEM belonging, instructor support, course organization, academic press) variables (Time 1) to course performance and intentions to persist in STEM (Time 2). Undergraduate students (N = 679; 60% female) enrolled in general chemistry at a large university completed two online self-report surveys consisting of established measures toward the beginning and end of the Autumn 2017 semester. Moderated mediation analyses will be conducted using the PROCESS macro with 5000 bootstrap samples (Hayes, 2013). The significance of the results will be discussed in terms of instructional context factors that faculty can employ to support students’ use of SRL and subsequent achievement and retention.

Better Together: Collaboration to Create More Inclusive Exams

Location: Multimedia Room (220)

Melissa Beers, Psychology
Darcy Hartman, Economics
Anne Wilson, Psychology

Learning Outcomes

  • Participants will identify potential sources of bias in test questions.
  • Participants will review models of collaboration for developing tests and other assessment tools.
  • Participants will practice reviewing questions and removing unintended barriers to student learning.

Description

Students know their grade is often riding on how well they do on the tests we give, but what are we really testing? If you create your own exams, you may not see potential sources of bias in your questions that could unfairly impact some students. For example, do you use scenarios international students will understand, or do questions assume specific background knowledge that is not universal? The more experienced you are, the more difficult it can be to recognize these barriers.

In this session, we will review the research on how tests help students learn and discuss how to make the most of this opportunity by writing effective test questions. We will share a process for collaborative item writing that can be leveraged in any class format, and discuss opportunities for (and obstacles to) collaboration within and across institutions. Participants will practice reviewing and giving feedback on test items. Engaging colleagues in developing assessments reduces individual burden, but more importantly removes unintended barriers to student learning.

Using Tech to Break Teaching’s Fourth Wall

Location: Eastman Room (100)

Nicole Kraft, College of Arts & Sciences
Cory Tressler, Office of Distance Education and eLearning

Learning Outcomes

  • Participants will understand how students and faculty can find educational connectivity in tech.
  • Participants will discover tools to provide connectivity beyond the classroom.
  • Participants will understand how to provide external connectivity without becoming overwhelmed.

Description

For learning to be truly successful, it must include faculty/student communication. Since pre- and post-class time provides limited opportunity and students rarely seek out conventional “office hours” it is incumbent upon faculty to meet students where they are—online. This session will show how to use technology to connect individually and in teams with students beyond conventional spaces (class/office hours) or external means (email). It will explore how students need and seek interactions, and demonstrate tools to provide meaningful interactive time and space to augment the educational experience. It will also show how to avoid being overwhelmed by this kind of accessibility. This goes beyond simply learning about a new tool. It involves a whole new way of thinking about student interaction.

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11:25 a.m.

Lightning Round: Making Content Relevant

Join us for three short presentations, followed by time for Q&A.
Teaching for Transfer in Foreign Language Teaching
Connecting Laboratory Experiments to Lecture Concepts
Integrating Real World Examples in Online/Flipped Classroom Videos: Issues and Opportunities

Location: International Room (110)

Teaching for Transfer in Foreign Language Teaching
Eun Jung Ko, Teaching and Learning

This presentation explores how the notion of teaching for transfer could be applied in a foreign language class and discusses how models of transfer would guide the instructional designs and implementations. The primary goal of teaching language is that students can transfer what they learn in the classroom to outside the classroom. We will discuss approaches to teaching for transfer which involve cross-linguistic transfer, skills transfer, and cultural transfer based on the notions of low road transfer and high road transfer in Korean as a foreign language class. The presenter provides evidence and possibility to design teaching for transfer in foreign language class.

Connecting Laboratory Experiments to Lecture Concepts
Katherine Moga, Chemistry & Biochemistry

General Chemistry students often have a hard time seeing the connections between lecture concepts and laboratory experiments. Because not every laboratory technique or method is directly covered in lecture, students compartmentalize the two spaces and do not often see the concepts are a constant in both. To help students see these connections, we have transformed our post-lab quizzes from multiple choice questions to a prompt for the students to create their own test questions. We’ll share the structure of the assignment, the grading rubric, and some feedback on the efficacy of the assignment.

Integrating Real World Examples in Online/Flipped Classroom Videos: Issues and Opportunities
Subbu Kumarappan, Ohio State ATI
Valerie Childress, Ohio State ATI

I created a series of videos for my online/flipped classes in marketing, management, and introductory economics. This presentation talks about my efforts to make those videos interesting for my students. The tips presented include how to (i) create and integrate real world/international examples in the online lectures, (ii) plan and execute video production, and (iii) render videos that are interesting for the students. I will present statistics on how much of the video content is actually viewed by the students and how it may (or may not) have an impact on their test scores and understanding.

Critically Listening to the Voices of Chinese International Students

Location: Multimedia Room (220)

Tamara Roose, Teaching and Learning
Jingyi Zhu, Teaching and Learning
Qingyuan Dong, Fisher School of Business
Boling Hu, Education and Human Ecology

Learning Outcomes

  • Participants will listen to the voices of Chinese international students at OSU and have the opportunity to respond with their own questions and concerns.
  • Participants will participate in reflection and dialogue regarding the assumptions and biases they may have toward the international student presence in their classroom contexts.
  • Participants will examine their own challenges and successes in creating inclusive classrooms of care and support for international students.

Description

Drawing from a critical listening project rooted in culturally sustaining pedagogy (Paris & Alim, 2017), this session will explore how as the instructor of two advanced ESL composition courses at OSU I sought to challenge my assumptions, broaden my perspectives, and deepen my understanding of my Chinese international students in order to better inform my teaching practices and create a more inclusive community of care and support. The project was centered on the concepts of listening, trust, care, and stories (Kinloch & San Pedro, 2014). The objectives were to discover how the course could become more responsive and relevant to Chinese international students’ needs and goals, as well as communicate care for students and validate their experiences by providing a platform for them to voice their journeys. The key components of the project were reflective journals, semi-structured interviews, a photo-voice activity, and small group discussions. I will share from my own reflections and observations, and Chinese international students from OSU who participated in the project will voice their own stories providing a unique opportunity for faculty at OSU to understand more about the journeys and perspectives of these invaluable students who have a significant presence on our campus.

Burn Your Teaching: Pedagogical Principles from Burning Man

Location: Eastman Room (100)

James O’Donnell, Arts Administration, Education & Policy

Learning Outcomes

  • Participants will identify the 10 principles which govern Burning Man and affiliated events across the country.
  • Participants will evaluate ways the 10 principles might enhance community, inclusivity, efficacy, and engagement in the classroom.
  • Participants will imagine ways to apply the 10 principles to their teaching.

Description

What principles guide your teaching? What might teachers learn from principles that, for over 30 years, have been successfully guiding the building of temporary communities across America? When most people think of Burning Man, they probably first think of desert debauchery. But most people don’t realize that Burning Man and its affiliated events are really social experiments. When a person steps into “a burn” they instantly find themselves in a place drastically different from the outside world. The events and their culture are governed by 10 principles which establish the shared values and dynamic tension that define the community. How is the famous arts-based event relevant to the classroom? Both are temporary gatherings of individuals with different beliefs and from various backgrounds around a central purpose – exploring ways of being in the world. Isn’t every subject, every class, another way to explore the world and how to live with others? In researching classroom culture, I have identified many ways in which the 10 principles can be applied by teachers to design more creative, collaborative, and inclusive spaces that encourage student efficacy and engagement. Find out why I and others like me are increasingly deciding to “burn” our teaching.

How to Engage in Professional Learning that Matters – The University Institute for Teaching and Learning

Location: Bob Evans Memorial Auditorium

Maria Pruchnicki, University Institute for Teaching and Learning
Jonathan Baker, University Institute for Teaching and Learning
Stephanie Rohdieck, University Center for the Advancement of Teaching
Sarah Holt, University Center for the Advancement of Teaching

Learning Outcomes

  • Participants will be able to identify the importance of professional development to teaching and learning effectiveness.
  • Participants will be able to describe University Institute for Teaching and Learning (UITL) programs and late-breaking initiatives.
  • Participants will review the professional learning model of the UITL and opportunities for engagement, with a special focus on Endorsements.
  • Participants will be able to discuss future directions and next-steps for faculty development.

Description

Excellence in teaching and learning is a core goal of the University, and the Institute for Teaching and Learning (ITL) was created to elevate the pursuit of pedagogical expertise across disciplines at Ohio State. However, professional development is a challenging goal in the lives of both new and experienced faculty, all balancing a variety of roles and professional demands. Engaging and including diverse instructors at all levels/ranks, the UITL professional learning model provides a mechanism to support and recognize these achievements through focused efforts and areas of study. Current instructional support programs include a new faculty learning community and Endorsements in teaching and learning. This informative session will update participants on the latest initiatives, and introduce the Ohio State community of teachers to the UITL’s model for professional learning. Descriptions and rationale will be presented, and session attendees will have the opportunity to consider their personal roadmap. Participants will also be asked to contribute their ideas for expanding UITL initiatives, including emerging and relevant teaching and learning topics for their disciplines.

The Virtual Poster Symposium: Using Universal Design to Accommodate All Students

Location: Gehres Room (214)

Kylienne Shaul, School of Environment and Natural Resources
Kimberly Winslow, School of Environment and Natural Resources
Ella Weaver, School of Environment and Natural Resources

Learning Outcomes

  • Participants will be able to recognize the importance of active learning and universal design in all classroom settings.
  • Participants will be able to describe what a virtual poster assignment is and how it is implemented in two distance courses.
  • Participants will be able to connect how assignments can be designed to support student-student connection and inclusivity in distance education.

Description

The traditional classroom offers a number of opportunities for fostering student connections with the material, instructor, and each other. While each of these interactions is possible in the online classroom, creating authentic student-student connections remains a challenge. One way to create meaningful student-student connections is by facilitating a well-designed assignment that is supported by active learning and universal design principles. Through these connections, a well-designed assignment can be the cornerstone of a student’s learning experience within a course. In this session, we’ll show how the scientific poster project supports universal design for learning principles and how we have transformed it to the virtual environment to connect our distance students to course content and each other. Through an active discussion, we intend to delve into the challenges and successes of transitioning assignments between classroom environments and re-envisioning course design as new technologies and innovations are introduced. We offer the virtual poster symposium as a case study for creating inclusive connections in the virtual classroom.

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1:10 p.m.

Lightning Round: Connecting with Students

Join us for three short presentations, followed by time for Q&A.

Wordle as a Crowdsourced Pre-Assessment for Introductory Courses
Promoting Inclusive Classroom Connections: The 1st Day Survey
Getting to Know You! Making Personal Connections with Students in an Online Course Using the Carmen Tools

Location: International Room (110)

Wordle as a Crowdsourced Pre-Assessment for Introductory Courses
Aaron Palmore, Department of Classics

This presentation models a pre-assessment technique from the first day of an introductory-level myth class. Every participant’s input is used to create connections across cultures and media and aid in metacognition (see, e.g., Tu 2013: 120). Participants respond to a Google Form question: “What does ‘classical myth’ mean to you?” Responses are put into a word cloud using Wordle. Participants then consider a technical entry from an Ancient Greek dictionary for the term μῦθος, whence “myth”. The instructor then leads an open discussion to reconcile the Wordle cloud and the historical definition.

Tu, Chih-Hsiun. 2013. Strategies for Building a Web 2.0 Learning Environment.

Promoting Inclusive Classroom Connections: The 1st Day Survey
Jen D. Wong, Human Development and Family Science

Instructors often employ icebreakers that require students to introduce themselves to the class. Such activities can be anxiety provoking for introverts or shy students; thereby, undermining the icebreakers’ goals. To create an inclusive classroom community among introverts, ambiverts, and extroverts, the presenter administers a survey on the first day that captures the students’ background, academic/personal goals, and learning styles. As evident by student and peer evaluations, the survey has served as a valuable tool in helping her to better adapt the course to the students’ goals while promoting an inclusive community where diverse students are comfortable asking questions and seeking support.

Getting to Know You! Making Personal Connections with Students in an Online Course Using the Carmen Tools
Elizabeth Trolli, College of Pharmacy

When a course is changed from an in-class setting to an online presence, instructors have to adjust their approach to teaching and onboarding students Additionally, intructors maintain the desire to deliver the same level of individual instructor/student interface with the students. For this specific course example, two Carmen functions were utilized which created a new online community and allowed for an individualized introduction from the students. This presentation will showcase these tools and demonstrate how to create a more personal connection with students in an online course.

e-Portfolios for Online Global Learning

Location: Multimedia Room (220)

Danielle Schoon, Near Eastern Languages and Cultures
Melinda McClimans, Middle Eastern Studies Center

Learning Outcomes

  • Participants will be able to define and discuss “perspective taking.”
  • Participants will understand the potential role of e-Portfolios in creating cross-cultural learning environments.
  • Participants will generate ideas and questions regarding digital alternatives to study abroad.

Description

Perspective-taking is essential for preparing students to be globally competent and career-ready. Cross-cultural environments now exist at students’ fingertips through their smartphones and other devices. It is possible to leverage this virtual environment by creating directed and protected digital environments. Sustained cross-cultural communication followed by a collaborative project may result in learning outcomes similar to study abroad in our students. Our e-Portfolio design is based on best practices in global education, e-learning, and the new field of online cultural learning (Jung, Gunawardena, & Moore, 2014). We will share our initial findings from a pilot project, as well as the toolkit we used to produce the learning activities and ongoing assessment practices. We are interested in whether digital cross-cultural education may provide a supplement to or preparation for the study abroad experience. At the same time, we argue that online cross-cultural experience is equally deserving of the same standards that study abroad programs are held to. Digital spaces for cross-cultural interaction and collaboration also require well-designed learning experiences in order to be considered a valid component of the academic landscape.

The Bravest Choice: A Poetics of Courage for the Twenty-First Century Classroom

Location: Gehres Room (214)

Jennifer Schlueter, Theatre
Elizabeth Wellman, 
Theatre

Learning Outcomes

  • Participants will gain an overview of the role of courage in the university classroom.
  • Participants will explore strategies for fostering courage in the university classroom.
  • Participants will obtain tangible examples of classroom exercises and practices.

Description

Fear—and its antidote, courage—often colors undergraduate and graduate student classroom experience. How can we, as postsecondary teachers, help our students risk in worthwhile, meaningful ways? Grounded in A.J. Martin’s 2011 study “Courage in the Classroom,” which bemoans the fact that “courage has received the least empirical attention, is usually tangentially included in assessment, often comprises single-item and unreliable measures, and rarely examines the factors that comprise it,” we will articulate a poetics of courage for the twenty-first century college classroom. To do so, we offer a hands-on session which will articulate the value of courage in the classroom, methodologies for cultivating it amongst our students both in seminar and studio courses, and strategies for assessing it in our curriculum and teaching. We will include examples of exercises and classroom structures we have deployed to foster courage, with some attention paid to Liz Lerman’s Critical Response Process (2003) as a particularly useful text. Most importantly, we will examine the ways student courage is fundamental to creating an inclusive classroom, as we believe that it is both an equalizing and empowering force for transformative learning.

Promoting Academic Success through Learning to Learn Strategies

Location: Bob Evans Memorial Auditorium

Kristin Henkaline, Educational Studies
Anna Brady, Educational Studies

Learning Outcomes

  • Participants will identify challenges students face when transitioning to Ohio State.
  • Participants will assess their current approach for promoting effective learning and time management strategies for students.
  • Participants will develop strategies to incorporate into their courses that support students’ time-management and long-term learning.

Description

Each year, many students join the Ohio State University (OSU) community. Whether these students are transitioning from a different OSU campus, a different university, or from high school offering support is essential. Many times, we take for granted that students know how to efficiently learn by the time they enter college. In fact, many students may not have developed effective learning and time-management strategies. In this session, the presenters will discuss the transition to Ohio State University. As a group, we will explore the challenges that students might face upon entering the university. We will consider how the struggles students face differ based on their educational background. Then, we will identify the role of instructors in helping students overcome challenges such as inadequate study methods and time management. Specifically, we will discuss strategies instructors can use to increase students understanding and retention of course material and ensure timely completion of course work. We will consider how these strategies can be applied to an array of fields and in a variety of formats. These approaches will allow instructors to reach out to particularly vulnerable populations of students to promote their sense of belonging at the university.

Using Writing to Introduce Diversity and Inclusion Concepts

Location: Eastman Room (100)

Shannon McLoughlin Morrison, Center for Aviation Studies

Learning Outcomes

  • Participants will be able to articulate how writing helps students engage with challenging concepts.
  • Participants will identify new techniques to help students become engaged learners.
  • Participants will be able to explain how a feminist pedagogical approach can create a unique environment.

Description

Since diversity and inclusion have become important topics within the university and the community, it has become increasingly important for faculty and lecturers to find unique ways to help students engage with these kinds of materials. Research from scholars in Feminist Pedagogy distinguishes the need create classroom environments that support “engaged learning.” One method for achieving this is through regular opportunities to write, and the implementation of the “think, share, pair” strategy. This session will mimic a session from the “Diversity in Aviation” course that was taught in the Autumn of 2017, to demonstrate the use of feminist pedagogy, writing, and various teaching methods, to create a learning environment that supports the engaged learner.

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2:10 p.m.

Lightning Round: Enhancing Teaching with Technology

Join us for three short presentations, followed by time for Q&A.

Lessons from Flipping the Classroom
Get Your Discussions Out of a Funk!
Getting to Know Outcomes in Carmen

Location: International Room (110)

Lessons from Flipping the Classroom
Matt Davies, School of Environment and Natural Resources

Flipping the classroom involves reversing the traditional paradigm of class lectures followed by assigned reading and homework. Instead, lectures are offered as videos and class-time is spent on interactive group tasks that aim to maximize active learning. The method creates challenges where students are unfamiliar with its aims but it offers the chance to build inclusive connections by allowing students of different backgrounds and interests to exchange knowledge. This presentation reflects on 3 semesters of a flipped 5000-level course to identify effective tools to maximize participation.

Get Your Discussions Out of a Funk!
Matt Yauk, College of Education and Human Ecology

Students may complain of having too many discussions, but at the same time, they’re essential in building interaction, contextualizing information, and developing self-regulation. Creating an authentic dialogue can ensure all students feel supported and welcomed (especially in an online environment). In this presentation, I will share and demonstrate how I’ve implemented various discussion “protocols” to build more dynamic discussions than the boring “post and reply to X peers” setup. I will also show real examples and demonstrate the exciting tools that have helped build student voice and create a strong community of learners in the process.

Getting to Know Outcomes in Carmen
Melissa Beers, Psychology

The Carmen Outcomes tool is a fabulous resource hidden in plain sight in your course right now. With just a few clicks, you can enable a whole new layer to your Gradebook and significantly enhance the feedback you give students. As a bonus, you get a new way to look at what matters most in your course! I will include examples of Outcomes in practice, and share tips you can use right away.

Laugh With Us! The Pedagogy of Laughter in Sex Education

Location: Gehres Room (214)

Kristen Kolenz, Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies
Jonathan Branfman, Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies

Learning Outcomes

  • Participants will be able to explain how laughter can enhance learning rather than distract from it.
  • Participants will identify topics or activities in their own teaching where they can apply a pedagogy of laughter.
  • Participants will develop skills for teaching about taboo topics like sexuality, gender, and race.

Description

In response to stigmatizing and inadequate high school sex-ed, graduate students in the Department of Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies have devised Sexual Pleasure, Health & Safety (SPHS), a feminist sex-ed presentation that deploys a pedagogy of laughter. SPHS uses humor to invite undergraduate participants into a temporary community with instructors, creating connections in place of exclusive judgments that students often expect. We do not treat humor as a distraction from learning, but rather a vital part of the community building necessary for Freirian liberatory education. While we teach that sex should be pleasurable and safe, we also use laughter to make the sex education process feel pleasurable and safe too. Quantitative and qualitative surveys show that participants value this pedagogy of laughter and recognize how it helps them learn.

Helping Students View Mistakes as Learning Opportunities

Location: Bob Evans Memorial Auditorium

Kathleen A. Harper, Department of Engineering Education
Richard J. Freuler, Department of Engineering Education

Learning Outcomes

  • Participants will gain insight into how leading figures in a variety of disciplines viewed mistakes as a central part of learning and development.
  • Participants will learn about a variety of post-exam exercises that encourage students to use the exams as formative learning experiences and discuss how these might be applied to their own courses.
  • Participants will learn about the role of failure analysis in product development and explore how this concept can be applied to coursework.

Description

“Everyone makes mistakes.” While this phrase is rather cliché, some students do not believe it applies to them in the context of our classes. Other students recognize their mistakes but feel doomed to never understand our course content. How can we help all of our students 1) realize that mistakes are part of education and 2) develop strategies to turn those mistakes into learning opportunities? We will share examples of how some well-known figures in a variety of fields thought about mistakes and failure and make connections to relevant educational literature (particularly the ideas of formative assessment, growth mindset, and failure analysis). We will also share some specific strategies we and others have used in our courses to encourage students to use errors as both formative feedback and learning experiences. Participants will have the opportunity during the session to explore how they might adapt these strategies to their own courses.

How to Implement and Evaluate Improv in Undergraduate Classrooms

Location: Multimedia Room (220)

Subbu Kumarappan, Ohio State ATI

Learning Outcomes

  • Participants will learn to implement improv in their classrooms and disciplines.
  • Participants will learn various strategies to make improv more interesting and informative.
  • Participants will learn to create suitable evaluation tools and questions for improv.

Description

I use improv and roleplay exercises to teach business concepts which create ample opportunities for students to laugh and have fun in the classrooms. But as an instructor, I have to turn these lighter moments into teachable moments. In this presentation, I share (i) how I use improv and roleplays in my classrooms and (ii) how to create suitable assessments to test student understandings. The students scored 76-78% for concepts based on the textbook which increased to 83-84% for concepts based on business improv. Such an encouraging improvement will be of use to Ohio State University faculty members. This presentation will include strategies such as: (i) using multiple students and tying multiple scenarios in improv, (ii) revisiting the same roleplay situation through multiple enactments over the semester, and (iii) creating suitable assessments. I plan to incorporate lively improv for interaction among the audience, watch videos of business improv and roleplays, along with a discussion of student score statistics.

Is a Picture Worth 1000 Words? Using Video to Engage Students in Discussing Implicit Bias

Location: Eastman Room (100)

Alice M. Teall, College of Nursing
Margaret Clark Graham, College of Nursing
Awais Ali, Nursing IT
John Pryba, Nursing IT
Janine Overcash, College of Nursing
Nathan Jenkins, College of Nursing

Learning Outcomes

  • Participants will be able to identify how using video can produce authentic learning opportunities.
  • Participants will be able to summarize the considerations for creating video cases that engage students with matters of bias.
  • Participants will be able to evaluate how the use of video can enhance the power of debriefing as a teaching tool.

Description

Are nursing students able to identify if/when implicit bias is affecting the actions or decisions of a healthcare provider? This question guided the development of a series of videos depicting a same-sex couple during a prenatal visit. Scenarios were developed to illustrate providers managing care by telehealth, and to authentically depict unconscious bias. Through a series of three videos, student-viewers assess care provided by a nurse in the office, observe a prenatal visit conducted by a nurse practitioner using telehealth technology, and then join the couple in a debrief of the visit to more fully appreciate their perceptions of bias.

The intention of using these videos as a teaching-learning strategy is to heighten awareness and recognition of implicit bias and to present alternate strategies. Looking for situational, unconscious bias can allow viewers to recognize and change their own patterns of providing care. Join the team that created the videos used for 200+ students within online and on-campus assessment labs to note the value of helping students engage with matters of inclusivity, diversity, and social justice. Presenters will discuss the benefits of using video to produce authentic student learning opportunities and active engagement.

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