Breakout Sessions

Time

 Sessions

11:00 a.m.
2:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.

11:00 a.m.

Disability as Diversity: Benefits of promoting an inclusive classroom environment

Location: Multimedia Room

Presenters

Jessie Green, M.Ed., Nisonger Center
Mallory Workman, Nisonger Center

Modeled Techniques

Case methods, Discussion, Group work

Learning Objectives

  • Participants will be able to identify the characteristics of intellectual and developmental disabilities.
  • Participants will be able to describe the benefits of including students with intellectual and developmental disabilities in their classrooms.
  • Participants will be able to apply strategies that support all types of student learning upon returning to the classroom.

Description

The Transition Options in Postsecondary Settings (TOPS) program has been providing an authentic college experience for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities at The Ohio State University since 2010. In this session, we aim to discuss, through research, instructor and student testimonies, and case studies, the universal benefits of including students of all learning abilities in the classroom. In addition, the session will provide participants with resources and strategies to promote positive student outcomes in these inclusive classrooms.

Effective Use of Clickers in Fostering Student Engagement

Location: International Room

Presenter

John Clay, Chemical Engineering

Modeled Technique

Instructional technology

Learning Objectives

  • compare and contrast technical information dissemination using slides versus clickers
  • observe how to directly measure student comprehension of a topic using clickers
  • learn how to build a repository of clicker questions

Description

The ability to successfully engage students in a course requires innovation and effort on behalf of the instructor.  There are several studies in the educational literature that have attempted to measure student engagement and link engagement to various teaching strategies.  Active learning is one of several techniques that has been demonstrated to improve student engagement.  One active learning technique is the use of clickers in the classroom to supplement chalkboard information dissemination.  OSU has selected Top Hat as a preferred vendor for clicker technology, and this platform has been successfully used in several classes as an effective teaching tool.  This presentation will demonstrate several different methods in which Top Hat clickers have been used in chemical engineering classes to supplement more traditional teaching methods.  Participants will learn how to build a repository of clicker questions and the presenter will demonstrate the utility of various types of clicker questions.  Through audience participation, the participants will observe how clickers can provide near-real-time feedback on student comprehension of a topic.  This feedback offers vital information on student mastery of a topic and allows the prof to revisit a challenging topic before moving on.

Loving the Lecture

Location: Bob Evans Memorial Auditorium

Presenter

Anne Wilson, M.A., Psychology

Modeled Techniques

To meet the session objectives, we will illustrate techniques of effective lecturing, effective slide design, and use of Socratic questioning. We will include opportunities for participants to engage in self-reflection and peer exchange to apply these concepts to their own courses and contexts.

Learning Objectives

  • Focus on the value of the lecture and its effective use in teaching
  • Identify potential problems in lecture development and delivery
  • Acquire specific ideas to improve their lectures

Description

Recent trends in pedagogy emphasize the importance of active learning in the classroom, yet lecturing – talking to students – remains a widely used and valuable teaching method with important applications. Unfortunately, in recent years the lecture has received little attention as a pedagogical strategy. As opposed to the stereotype of lectures being dull, dry, and boring we see the lecture as a classic way to inform, engage, and inspire students. We will focus on the value and appropriate use of effective lecturing as a pedagogical tool and share strategies for developing and enhancing the lecture based on psychological research. We will go beyond simple presentation or performance skills to provide strategies instructors can use right away to improve both lectures’ impact and students’ engagement and success.

Multiple Professional Development On-Ramps into Teaching Communities of Practice 

Location: Eastman Room

Presenters

Caroline A. Breitenberger, Center for Life Sciences Education

Judith S. Ridgway, Center for Life Sciences Education

Erica Szeyller, Center for Life Sciences Education

David Sovic, Center for Life Sciences Education

Amy E. Kulesza, Center for Life Sciences Education

Modeled Techniques

Discussion,Group work, Think-Pair-Share, Jigsaw, Application Cards

Learning Objectives

  • Identify factors that are opportunities or obstacles to the development of their own Teaching Community of Practice
  • Identify characteristics of Center for Life Sciences Education professional development and networking components that support community members’ increasing expertise within the Teaching Community of Practice.
  • Evaluate the feasibility of components that could meet the professional development needs of TAs and instructors in their own department.

Description

Development of a teaching community of practice (TCoP) in OSU’s Center for Life Sciences Education (CLSE) helped instructional staff articulate shared goals, implement research-based teaching practices, and align our program with national calls for  undergraduate biology education reform. Three professional development (PD) components build on existing strengths at OSU and provide focus for the CLSE TCoP, while a variety of networking activities add flexibility and sustainability. CLSE PD components include a  customizable course for Teaching Assistants (TAs), staff-facilitated course planning activities in which new instructors apply backward design, and a Summer Teaching Institute in which TAs and instructors at all levels of experience collaboratively immerse themselves in the development of instructional materials supporting specific student learning outcomes. Networking activities that sustain and extend the impact of the CLSE TCoP include a literature and research discussion group, a TA collaborative organization, an instructional resource portal, and research collaborations to disseminate the results of CLSE STEM education reforms. Session participants will evaluate if and how the described components could be used to support their own TCoP.

Transforming Culture through the Education for Clinical Interprofessional Simulation Excellence Program

Location: Gehres Room

Presenters

Marcia Nahikian-Nelms, Medical Dietetics Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

Georgiana Sergakis, Respiratory Therapy Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

Monica Robinson, Occupational Therapy, Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

Jill Clutter,  Health Sciences, Health Rehabilitation Sciences

Erin Thomas, Physical Therapy Health and Rehabilitation Sciences

Modeled Techniques

Discussion, Group work, Case methods

Learning Objectives

  • Describe the development of educational steps for interprofessional simulation that build a climate of mutual respect and understanding for other health and social science professionals.
  • Provide educational strategies that lead to Increased understanding of the roles and responsibilities of other health and social science professions
  • Demonstrate examples of interprofessional assignments that lead to Improved interprofessional communication skills.

Description

The Education for Clinical Interprofessional Simulation Excellence (ECLIPSE) program at the Ohio State University demonstrates that educational culture can be changed through grassroots efforts. Through ECLIPSE, an interprofessional (IP) simulation that includes team rounding and collaborative patient care was implemented. To date, more than 1,600 students from medicine, nursing, pharmacy, physical therapy, occupational therapy, respiratory therapy, medical dietetics and social work have participated. The IOM recommends that IP education be integrated for healthcare students (IOM, 2015). The Interprofessional Education Collaboration competencies include teamwork and collaboration (IPEC, 2011). Though the benefits of IP simulation are great, challenges exist. The logistics of scheduling students from multiple programs together, gaining faculty investment, making curriculum changes and creating quality patient scenarios can provide roadblocks.

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2:00 p.m.

Gettin’ Jiggy with DNA: Culturally Responsive Teaching in a University Science Methods Course

Location: Gehres Room

Presenter

Brittany Garvin-Hudson, Ph.D, College of Education, Teaching & Learning

Modeled Techniques

Discussion, Group work, Culturally Responsive Teaching & Learning

Learning Objectives

  • Participants will gain an understanding of culturally responsive pedagogical methods around science teaching and learning.
  • Participants will understand that science is a process, and that scientific procedures must be implemented in a stepwise and logical sequence in order to extract and visualize DNA from their own cheek cells.
  • Participants will conduct an investigation and use models to illustrate biological processes and concepts related to DNA packaging.

Description

Culturally responsive teaching is based on the notion that culture is a salient part of learning and teaching. One of the main premises of culturally responsive teaching and pedagogy is that it uses the students’ own culture to help them achieve academic success. Gay (2000) posits that culturally responsive teaching addresses what she terms as the “achievement dilemma.” That is, too many students of color have not been achieving in school as well as they should (and can). She argues, “Research findings and classroom practices to date indicate that culturally responsive teaching does improve achievement. The only problem is that such classroom practices are relatively few” (Gay, 2000, p. 201). This is especially true for STEM education.

In this session, you will construct knowledge and develop an understanding of culturally responsive science teaching practices; gain insight on effective pedagogy that validates and affirms marginalized youths’ experiences in science; and learn strategies through hands-on learning that can be implemented in the science methods classroom to help foster success among culturally, ethnically, racially, and linguistically diverse students.

Reference

Gay, G. (2000). Culturally responsive teaching. New York: Teachers College Press.

Leveraging Technology to Build a Community of Practice at a Distance

Location: International Room

Presenters

Larry Hurtubise, Department of Pediatrics

Anand Khurma, College of Medicine

Elissa Hall, The Mayo Clinic

Modeled Techniques

Instructional Technology: TodaysMeet, a web based back channel communication tools, NoteApp an affinity diagraming tool, and a few of the suite of Google Apps.

Learning Objectives

  • Discuss the benefits of engaging in a community of practice at a distance
  • Discuss the need for online collaboration tools when developing scholarly projects
  • Identify strategies for creating their own community of practice.

Description

Granting agencies and education conferences often prioritize collaborative proposals.1-2 However, educators face challenges to collaborating at a distance.3-4  During this interactive session, speakers will demonstrate and discuss strategies used successfully to develop projects leading to accepted educational research posters, presentations, publications, and grant awards.5-6  Additionally, engagement with collaborative technologies allows for professionals to refine interpersonal communication skills in this new environment and develop strategies to reduce barriers imposed by distance.

Facilitators will demonstrate collaboration tools and share their perspectives of leveraging technology to successfully develop education projects at a distance. In this session, participants will interact with the speakers, share their perspectives, discuss an ideal structure for a virtual network for educators and have the opportunity to join the virtual network. Bring a mobile device.

References

  1. Gruppen LD. Improving medical education research. Teach Learn Med. 2007;19(4):331–5. doi:10.1080/10401330701542370.
  2. Reed D a., Beckman TJ, Wright SM, Levine RB, Kern DE, Cook D a. Predictive validity evidence for medical education research study quality instrument scores: Quality of submissions to JGIM’s medical education special issue. J Gen Intern Med. 2008;23(7):903–907. doi:10.1007/s11606-008-0664-3.
  3. Glassick CE. Elusiveness of the Scholarship of Teaching. Acad Med. 2000;75(9):877–880.
  4. Sullivan GM, Simpson D, Cook DA, et al. Redefining Quality in Medical Education Research: A Consumer’s View. J Grad Med Educ. 2014;6(3):424–429. doi:10.4300/JGME-D-14-00339.1.
  5. Simpson D, Fincher RME, Hafler JP, et al. Advancing Educators and Education : Defining the Components and Evidence of Educational Scholarship Summary Report and Findings from the AAMC Group on Educ. 2007:41.
  6. Reed D a, Cook D a, Beckman TJ, Levine RB, Kern DE, Wright SM. Association between funding and quality of published medical education research. JAMA. 2007;298(9):1002–1009. doi:10.1001/jama.298.9.1002.

Mapping the Work of Writing

Location: Multimedia Room

Presenters

Chris Manion, Center for the Study and Teaching of Writing

Evan Thomas, Center for the Study and Teaching of Writing

Modeled Techniques

Discussion, Group work

Learning Objectives

  • Identify how language in your writing assignments falls within Bloom’s Taxonomy.
  • Rearticulate assignment language and develop ancillary activities to broaden the kinds of learning across the spectrum mapped by Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Description

The presenters at this session will show how writing assignments at Ohio State may unnecessarily limit the kinds of intellectual work students are asked to do. Using course materials collected from a survey of second-level writing instructors, the presenters will map onto Bloom’s Taxonomy the kinds of verbs instructors used to describe writing assignments (Anderson, et al. 2001). Our preliminary findings suggest that while many writing assignments engage students in conceptual analysis and understanding, fewer engage students in the application, evaluation or creation of knowledge, nor with process-oriented or metacognitive tasks.

After briefly sharing our map of writing tasks, we will share examples of writing assignments and activities from our survey pool that explore this less charted territory within Bloom’s Taxonomy, and give participants an opportunity to design materials that stretch students’ writing into new intellectual realms.

References

Anderson, L.W. (Ed.), Krathwohl, D.R. (Ed.), Airasian, P.W., Cruikshank, K.A., Mayer, R.E., Pintrich, P.R., Raths, J., & Wittrock, M.C. (2001). A taxonomy for learning, teaching, and assessing: A revision of Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives (Complete edition). New York: Longman.

Using Metacognition to Teach Students How to Learn

Location: Bob Evans Memorial Auditorium

Presenter

Matthew W. Stoltzfus, Chemistry & Biochemistry

Modeled Techniques

Instructional technology

Learning Objectives

  • learn how to implement metacognition in their course.
  • analyze best practices to enhance student performance
  • learn which interventions worked and which ones didn’t based on pre/post test scores

Description

In the Summer of 2016, Saundra McGuire’s book Teach Students  How to Learn: Strategies You Can Incorporate Into Any Course to Improve Student Metacognition, Study Skills, and Motivation, was distributed to the Ohio State Chemistry teaching faculty. Faculty members were encouraged to incorporate the practices from this book in their classrooms.

During the first week of their general chemistry course, students were given a substantive chemistry pre-test.  Based on their pre-test performance, they were given recommendations to attend a personalized combination of some or all of the following sessions: study skills workshop, small group meetings with peer mentors, group led study sessions, Friday happy hour sessions, and Dennis Learning Center academic coaches.

This session will take a look at the performance of the students from my first semester general chemistry course and will compare and contrast which group resulted in the best pre/post test gains in student performance.

Who are you and why do I care? Doing the elevator speech without the elevator

Location: Eastman Room

Presenter

Marc Ankerman, Fisher College of Business MHR

Modeled Technique

Discussion

Learning Objectives

  • be able to independely convery thier message of who they are to a variety of audiences.
  • be challenged by receiveing unique and creative apporoaches to thier current methods of engagement during networking activities
  • create and engage in new questions for thier meet and greet opportunities

Description

How often are you in a situation where you have to quickly meet and greet someone?  Whether it is a business professional setting, interview, or social setting many of us are greeted with the dreaded question of, “So, tell me about yourself.” Regurgitation of a resume or the same old answer leads others to quickly find someone new to meet or talk to during this brief “elevator-type” encounter.  Come learn new ideas, respond to unique methods of standing out (while not making every experience be the most stressful of your day) and getting noticed in this very common and much needed skill.

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 3:00 p.m.

Beyond Google: Developing Critical Thinkers

Location: Bob Evans Memorial Auditorium

Presenters

Cheryl Lowry, Ph.D., University Libraries, Teaching & Learning

Amada Folk, M.L.I.S., University Libraries, Teaching & Learning

Robyn Ness, University Libraries, Teaching & Learning

Modeled Techniques

Discussion, Group work, Hands-on exploration of an ebook

Learning Objectives

  • Describe what OSU Libraries’ new ebook called Choosing & Using Sources: A Guide to Academic Research offers teachers and students.
  • Find information that you can assign students in Choosing & Using Sources.
  • Customize one or more learning activities from the Choosing & Using Sources Instructor’s Manual for your discipline and courses.

Description

One important facet of critical thinking is the ability to not only locate high-quality information sources, but also to analyze, evaluate, and use them. Implicit in these abilities are asking good research questions and understanding the differences between various information source types. To continue helping faculty teaching these skills and students learning them, OSU Libraries recently replaced its long-lived interactive online net.TUTOR tutorials with an open access ebook called Choosing & Using Sources:A Guide to Academic Research and published through Pressbooks.  An accompanying ebook Instructor’s Manual should be ready by Fall Semester 2017. This presentation will provide a hands-on introduction to the Choosing & Using Sources ebook, as well as give participants experience at quickly customizing relevant learning activities for their own disciplines to meet the needs of students in their own courses. (The learning activities are from the ebook’s accompanying Instructor’s Manual.) Evidence to be shared includes how instruction related to navigating the information landscape contributes to college students’ academic success. Participants should bring their smartphone, laptop, or iPad.

 

Classroom as Community: Lessons from an Innovative Space

Location: International Room

Presenters

Lisa Cravens-Brown, Psychology

Ziv Bell, Psychology

Modeled Techniques

Discussion, Group work, Instructional technology, Case methods

Learning Objectives

  • Participants will gain a better understanding of what it is like to teach in an active learning space
  • Participants will examine how a classroom environment affects community building and engagement in course material
  • Participants will explore ways to use the lessons learned from the innovative space to enhance their own courses, whether in an innovative or traditional classroom setting

Description

Ohio State has recently opened a new classroom setting in Campbell 100. This innovative classroom features an unusual seating schematic, multiple white boards, 2 small break out session rooms, 8 projection screens, and multiple types of seating.  Students & instructors are able to project from their technology onto the screens in the breakout rooms, as well as in the larger space, and there are 4 microphones available in the space. The session leaders for this session both taught in this space during autumn term, and one is teaching in there during spring term.  We collected IRB approved data from students who took psychology courses in this and other innovative spaces on campus regarding their perceptions of the classroom and how the classroom facilitated a sense of community and collaboration. We would like to share our experiences and lessons learned from this space, as well as exploring with participants ways to transfer our experiences to other, more traditional, spaces. During the session, we will share some of the findings from our study, as well as some of the activities we did with students in this space.

Optimizing student learning of clinical standardized assessment using integrated instructional technologies

Location: Multimedia Room

Presenter

Andrew Persch, Occupational Therapy

Modeled Techniques

Instructional technology, Case methods

Learning Objectives

  • identify limitations of instruction in clinical standardized assessment using traditional methods
  • describe common challenges experienced when integrating multiple instructional technologies
  • explain the benefits of instruction in clinical standardized assessment using integrated technologies

Description

Innovation in medical and health sciences education is lacking. Within the rehabilitation professions, clinical standardized assessment is traditionally taught using a combination of reading, lecture, demonstration, and hands-on practice. The pros and cons of this approach are well known (Davies, Dean, & Ball, 2013). Novel instructional technologies provide an opportunity to teach core content in innovative and engaging ways (Prober & Heath, 2012). This presentation will focus on the integration video-based observation, voice-over explanation and coaching, and video screen capture technologies. Specifically, the instructor records an expert clinician administering a specific standardized assessment. Next, the instructor provides voice-over narration to the video making sure to note observations, interpretations, and gold-standard scoring of the assessment. Finally, the instructor uses video screen capture technology to score the assessment by hand (or electronically). These products (video, narration, screen capture) are combined/ synchronized using basic video editing software. The resulting product approximates a Khan Academy style video which complements traditional methods of instruction and articulates well with a partially flipped classroom. Pilot data will be reported.

Participant Showcase for Course Design Learning Community 

Location: Eastman Room

Presenters

Teresa Johnson, University Center for the Advancement of Teaching

Katy Proudfoot, Veterinary Preventive Medicine

Modeled Techniques

Case methods

Learning Objectives

  • Be able to identify the purpose and goals of the Course Design Learning Community.
  • Be able to explain benefits of data-driven course-level assessment.
  • Be able to apply concepts learned during the session to their own teaching.

Description

The Course Design Learning Community offers faculty and staff a year-long opportunity to focus on making data driven improvements to a particular course as part of a community of peers. Graduates of the Course Design Institute who enjoyed the camaraderie and the scholarly community of the CDI can continue learning about course design and effective teaching while establishing collegial relationships across disciplines and reinforcing a faculty culture that brings together the scholarship and practice of teaching. The participants from the last two communities will share their experience of and insights gleaned from going through the backward design process. They will also present some of their research questions, data collection, results, and conclusions from their course-level assessment. Those in attendance will see new models for determining course effectiveness and have a chance to engage the participants with questions about backward course design.

Promoting Understanding of Self and Others Through Arts Activities

Location: Gehres Room

Presenters

Kathleen M. Goodyear, Dept. of Arts Administration, Education & Policy

Modeled Techniques

Discussion, Group work, Using an arts activity to facilitate identity exploration

Learning Objectives

  • understand theoretically how arts activities, through engaging people in intrapersonal and interpersonal dialogue, can act as a transformative bridge between experiential and conceptual knowing, promoting greater understanding of self and others (Heron, 1992; Yorks & Kasl, 2006);
  • be aware of how such identity-exploration arts activities have been and could be used in higher education classrooms; and
  • gain ideas about how they could use these types of activities with their students.

Description

Learn how to incorporate visual artmaking, creative writing, theatre/improv, music, and movement activities into your classroom to facilitate students’ increased understanding of their own and others’ individual and cultural identities. These insights can promote both personal integration and growth and empathy for others, which is vital for students’ becoming compassionate, constructive members of our pluralistic society and workplaces. Kathleen will discuss Heron’ (1992) multiple ways of knowing framework and Yorks and Kasl’s (2006) taxonomy for using expressive ways of knowing to foster intrapersonal and interpersonal transformative learning. She will discuss examples of using these activities in higher education classrooms, including from her in-class dissertation research, and how these activities have great potential in diversity/social justice and sociology general education courses, teacher education, social work, healthcare, and other helping profession programs, high-impact practices such as first- and second-year programs, service learning, and study abroad programs, etc. Attendees will be invited to participate in a short activity and then to engage in a discussion about how they could utilize arts activities in their classrooms.

References

Heron, J. (1992). Feeling and personhood: Psychology in another key. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

Yorks, L., & Kasl, E. (2006). I know more than I can say: A taxonomy for using expressive ways of knowing to foster transformative learning. Journal of Transformative Education, 4(1), 43-64. doi:10.1177/1541344605283151

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